Life-transforming ideas have always come to me through books.
– bell hooks

I’m firmly convinced that reading has been a key to my development, and allowed me to meet some incredible people.

My tastes in books are varied, I purposely try to read books that cover different genres and authors to try to expand my own horizons. So, if you don’t dig any of the books on the list this month, stay tuned, you’ll likely see an entirely different selection just a few weeks.

At the end of the year, I love looking back and seeing the variety of books I’ve covered.

Alright, enough of my blabbing, time to get reading:

The Tiger: A True Story of Vengence and Survival by John Vaillant – As crazy as this might sound, this is one of my all-time favorite books. It’s an incredibly written true story of a man-eating tiger that prowled around Siberia in 1997. Vaillant weaves together a story that ranges from the history of tigers to environmental conservation to Russian culture that I couldn’t put down.

And Then All Hell Broke Loose: Two Decades in the Middle East by Richard Engle – I’ve read many books trying to learn about the impact of long wars on the Middle East. One of the better ones is this by NBC News Foreign Correspondent Richard Engle. It’s half biography and half reporting and gives a really good insight into this region that you don’t normally get from the news.

Moonwalking With Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering Everything by Joshua Foer – I’ve always been fascinated by people who have epic memories. I wanted to get into the concept of a mind palace and Foer’s book provided just the info I needed. In it, he covers how he first started reporting on people with amazing memories, and then decided to try to compete in a memory championship using the tactics he learned.

The End of Jobs: Money, Meaning, and Freedom Without the 9-5 by Taylor Pearson – I’ll admit that I’m friendly with the author, Taylor, but won’t let that skew the fact that I think this is a fascinating book for anyone who is looking at what the future of jobs might be. We hear a lot of late about automation and machines taking things over, this book takes a deep into that and the ramifications.

The Paris Wife: A Novel by Paula McLain – Almost two years ago, I was traveling around Spain and the South of France looking for a book and a friend recommended this one to me. It’s a fictional account of Ernest Hemingway’s first wife, Hadley, whom he married and moved to Paris with to write. It’s a great story that felt quite real when I was reading it, especially the turbulence of their relationship.

Book Links:

Here are a few interesting links about books I’ve read lately:

  • The Great Books – A look at the curriculum at a Maryland College that features only great classic books (not a single living author is included in the list).
  • 101 Books About Where and How We Live – I loved this list that breaks down books based on understanding people, things we’re building, future and the cities we live in.
  • The Biggest Book Club Books of 2016 – Either I’m very counterculture or really missing out since I didn’t tackle a single book on this list.

These are just a few of the books that I love. I hope you might find one of them interesting. If not, stay tuned for next month. In the meantime, I’d love to know what you’re reading and if you have any suggestions.

Don’t hesitate to click reply and let me know what books you’ve been loving.

– Liz

P.S. Note there are affiliate links in this email if you want to avoid them, just copy and paste the titles into Amazon (or whatever bookseller’s website you use).

 


 

Read the best books first, or you may not have a chance to read them at all.
– Henry David Thoreau

I’m firmly convinced that reading has been a key to my development, and allowed me to meet some incredible people.

My tastes in books are varied, I purposely try to read books that cover different genres and authors to try to expand my own horizons. So, if you don’t dig any of the books on the list this month, stay tuned, you’ll likely see an entirely different selection just a few weeks.

I don’t know about you, but this month, I’m happy for the distraction of books.

Alright, enough of my blabbing, time to get reading:

The Arm: Inside the Billion-Dollar Mystery of the Most Valuable Commodity in Sports by Jeff Passan – I am a massive baseball fan, so I always read the hot book on the sport each year. I’m so happy I did with The Arm. While most baseball books look at life over the course of a season, game by game, Passan weaves a number of stories looking at players, teams, and doctors, all trying to figure out to deal with the uptick in Tommy John surgery among pitchers from high school to the MLB.

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck: A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life by Mark Manson – If you don’t already read Mark’s blog, give it a try (I include a link to it in the Book Links section below). I love his stuff so I immediately grabbed this book when it came out and wasn’t disappointed. If you’re looking for an approach to life that is all about how to ‘stomach lemons’ instead of ‘making lemonade’ then this is for you.

Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman – For the longest time, I poo-pooed science fiction and fantasy books. Yea, I was stupid. Then Neverwhere came along and I find myself turning to this genre more than others this year. In Neverwhere, Gaiman tells the story of Richard, a regular guy who lives in London, who one day accidentally finds an entire world of people he never knew existed living in London Below.

Finding the Dragon Lady: The Mystery of Vietnam’s Madame Nhu by Monique Brinson Demery – I love history books, especially about times and places where I don’t know much about. So, I enjoyed Finding the Dragon Lady, it’s a non-fiction biography style that reads like a fiction book. It tells the fascinating life of Madame Nhu, the First Lady of South Vietnam during the war who was sent into exile, found by the author 30+ years later, and convinced to tell her story.

Daily Rituals: How Artists Work by Mason Currey – If you’ve ever wanted to know how famous artists got things done, check out this book. It basically gives you the daily life of everyone from Anne Rice to Karl Marx. It’s a really easy read and you can pick up quite a few little hidden productivity tips from some of the most successful artists, writers, and thinkers in the world.

Book Links:

Here are a few interesting links about books I’ve read lately:

These are just a few of the books that I love. I hope you might find one of them interesting. If not, stay tuned for next month. In the meantime, I’d love to know what you’re reading and if you have any suggestions.

Don’t hesitate to click reply and let me know what books you’ve been loving.

– Liz

P.S. Note there are affiliate links in this email if you want to avoid them, just copy and paste the titles into Amazon (or whatever bookseller’s website you use).